Saturday, 18 November 2017    HomeAbout UsContact Us    









You are here: Home News


Berries Associated With Reducing High Blood Pressure
Posted by SoundHealth, in News
Topics: Blueberries Blood Pressure Hypertension Anthocyanins

  Mail To Friend    Printer Friendly Bookmark and Share

Eating blueberries is linked to protecting against high blood pressure, according to new research.

High blood pressure (hypertension), is defined as having a systolic and diastolic blood pressure greater than 140 and 90 mmHg, and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

The new findings show that bioactive compounds in blueberries called anthocyanins offer protection against hypertension. Compared with those who do not eat blueberries, those eating at least one serving a week reduce their risk of developing the condition by 10 per cent.

Anthocyanins belong to the bioactive family of compounds called flavonoids and are found in high amounts in blackcurrants, raspberries, aubergines, and blueberries. Other forms of flavonoids are found in many fruits, vegetables, grains and herbs.

This is the first large study to investigate the effect of different flavonoids on hypertension.

Study Details

The team studied 134,000 women and 47,000 men over a period of 14 years. None of the participants had hypertension at the start of the study. Subjects were asked to complete health questionnaires every two years and their dietary intake was assessed every four years. Incidence of newly diagnosed hypertension during the 14-year period was then related to consumption of various different flavonoids.

During the study, 35,000 participants developed hypertension. Dietary information identified tea as the main contributor of flavonoids, with apples, orange juice, blueberries, and strawberries also providing important amounts.

When the researchers looked at the relation between individual subclasses of flavonoids and hypertension, they found that participants consuming the highest amounts of anthocyanins (found mainly in blueberries and strawberries in this US-based population) were eight per cent less likely to be diagnosed with hypertension than those consuming the lowest amounts. The effect was even stronger in participants under 60.

The effect was stronger for blueberry rather than strawberry consumption. Compared to people who ate no blueberries, those eating at least one serving of blueberries per week were 10 per cent less likely to become hypertensive.

"Our findings are exciting and suggest that an achievable dietary intake of anthocyanins may contribute to the prevention of hypertension," said the lead author.

"Anthocyanins are readily incorporated into the diet as they are present in many commonly consumed foods. Blueberries were the richest source in this particular study as they are frequently consumed in the US. Other rich sources of anthocyanins in the UK include blackcurrants, blood oranges, aubergines and raspberries."

Blueberries are already well known to be one of the most health-protective superfoods. They contain more antioxidants that any other fruit or vegetable, including Vitamin C and E, fiber, potassium, calcium and folic acid. As well as the beneficial flavonoids anthocyanins, blueberries are also extremely high in resveratrol, a flavonoid that protects against inflammation and has an anti-ageing effect. Blueberries help to protect every cell in the body by their ability to neutralize damaging free-radical chemicals.

Blueberries are readily available and should form a regular part of the diet. Add them to smoothies or fruit salads, and sprinkle them onto cereal.

Research Paper Details:

Cassidy A, O'Reilly EJ, Kay C, et al. Habitual intake of flavonoid subclasses and incident hypertension in adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Feb;93(2):338-47.


Link to this article:   Show: HTML LinkFull LinkShort Link
Share or Bookmark this page: You will need to have an account with the selected service in order to post links or bookmark this page.

                 
  
Subscribe via RSS or email:
Follow us through RSS or email. Click the RSS icon to subscribe to our feed.

     
  

Related Articles:
Add a Comment
You must be registered and logged in to comment.





Visit Vaccines.Me for information and education on vaccination.


Latest Articles
Some Notes of Advice on Health, Disease and 'Medicine'
Cooking With Vegetable Oils Releases Toxic Cancer-Causing Chemicals, Say Experts
Cancer Simplified: Part 5 - The Initiators and Promoters of Cancer
Cancer Simplified: Part 4 - The Immune System's In-Built Anti-Cancer Mechanism
Cancer Simplified: Part 3 - Cancer Is Simply a Failure of the Immune System
Cancer Simplified: Part 2 - An Analogy for Different Perceptions About Treatment of Cancer
Cancer Simplified: Part 1 - What Is Cancer and How Does It Develop?
Honey and Anti-Biotic Resistance: A New Approach!
On the Rejection of Hijaamah by the Physicians (Shaykh Muhammad Bin Ibraaheem Aal Al-Shaykh)
How to Limit Efffects of Bisphenol-A Upon Children

Pages
No pages found.

Most Popular
Garlic, Honey and Apple Cider Vinegar: Must Have Excellent Home Remedy
How To Eat Fruit Properly
Rocket: A Spicy Salad Leaf With Potent Health Benefits
Ibn al-Qayyim: Henna Has Many Benefits from Treating Headaches to Burns
Why We Need Protein in our Diets
Five Superfoods You Should Be Eating Everyday
Talbina: Relaxation For the Heart of the Sick Person
Deodorant And Anti-Perspirant Dangers - Do You Know What You're Putting Under Your Armpits?
The Different Kinds Of Exercises Your Body Needs
What Foods Are Good For Your Eyesight?

Archives (View more)
2016 • January
2015 • November
2014 • March
2014 • February
2013 • October
2012 • October
2012 • August
2012 • January
2011 • December
2011 • November
2011 • October
2011 • September


Copyright © 2017 . All rights reserved. RSSTagsPrivacyLegal and Terms of Use I Need a Good Arabic Grammar Guide