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Antiinflammatory Effects of Ginger and Some of Its Components in Human Bronchial Epithelial (BEAS-2B) Cells

Ginger is an herb. The rhizome (underground stem) is used as a spice and also as a medicine. It can be used fresh, dried and powdered, or as a juice or oil. Ginger is commonly used to treat various types of "stomach problems," including motion sickness, morning sickness, colic, upset stomach, gas, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting after surgery, as well as loss of appetite. Other uses include treating upper respiratory tract infections, cough, and bronchitis.

Podlogar JA, Verspohl EJ. Antiinflammatory effects of ginger and some of its components in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. 1. Phytother Res. 2012 Mar;26(3):333-6. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3558. Epub 2011 Jun 23.

The proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 is increased in asthmatic patients. Traditionally, ginger is used as an antiinflammatory drug. An extract and several compounds of Zingiber officinale (ginger) were tested in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells) with respect to their effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin?8 (IL-8) and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted). An oily extract of ginger rhizome with?>?25% total pungent compounds, ginger volatile oil, ar-curcumene and ?-pinene reduced the LPS-induced IL-8 secretion (measured by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), whereas a spissum extract, the pungents [6]-gingerol and its metabolite [6]-shogaol, and the terpenoids citral and ?-phellandrene showed no effect. The LPS-induced slight increase of RANTES was reduced by volatile oil, ar-curcumene and ?-pinene. There was no effect of LPS on TNF-?. Our results suggest that distinct ginger compounds could be used as antiinflammatory drugs in respiratory infections.